Is Density Intensive Or Extensive?

Is density intensive or extensive quizlet?

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What is the difference between an extensive property and an intensive property.

Intensive properties do not depend on the amount of matter that is present.

Examples of intensive properties include boiling point, density and state of matter..

How is density An extensive property?

Extensive properties depend on the amount of matter present, for example, the mass of gold. Intensive properties do not depend on the amount of matter present, for example, the density of gold. Heat is an example of an extensive property, and temperature is an example of an intensive property.

Why is density An example of an intensive property?

Density is an intensive property because there is a narrow range of densities across the samples. No matter what the initial mass was, densities were essentially the same. Since intensive properties do not depend on the amount of material, the data indicate that density is an intensive property of matter.

Is smell intensive or extensive?

PropertyPropertyExtensive or Intensive PropertyPhysical or Chemical Propertyodorintensivephysicalweightextensivephysicalmalleabilityintensivephysicaltendency to corrodeintensivechemical9 more rows•Sep 2, 2007

Is temperature an intensive or extensive property?

An intensive property is a bulk property, meaning that it is a local physical property of a system that does not depend on the system size or the amount of material in the system. Examples of intensive properties include temperature, T; refractive index, n; density, ρ; and hardness of an object, η.

Is density an intensive or extensive property Why?

Mass and volume are both extensive physical properties. However, density is an intensive property. This means that regardless of the amount of an object, the density is still the same. This is due to the fact that when the mass of the substance increases, it follows that the volume it occupies also increases.

Is shape extensive or intensive?

Physical properties that do not depend on the amount of substance present are called intensive properties. Intensive properties do not change with changes of size, shape, or scale. Examples of intensive properties are as follows in the Table 1.1.

Is malleability an intensive or extensive property?

1 Answer. Malleability is certainly an intensive property.

Which of these is an example of investigating intensive property?

weighing sand in a bag measuring the length of wire determining if a rock is magnetic recording the volume of water in a cylinder.